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FSM2065: Food and Beverage in the Hospitality Industry (Buckley): Meal Plans with Lodging

American

  • American Plan

                >Means that the nightly rate quoted by a hotel or resort includes three meals

                a day, e.g., breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/modified-american-plan-for-hotel-guests-1862822

Modified American

  • Modified American Plan

                   >​Means that the quoted rate includes two meals a day,

                     including breakfast and either lunch or dinner.

                     In the Modified American plan, these meals are provided

                     on site, and they usually are furnished in the hotel dining room.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/modified-american-plan-for-hotel-guests-1862822

Continental

  • Continental Plan

​                  > The Continental Plan means that the quoted rate includes breakfast on

                    the premises for every guest who occupies a room overnight.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/modified-american-plan-for-hotel-guests-1862822

European

  • European Plan

​                   >Means that the quoted rate is strictly for lodging and does not include any

                  meals.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/modified-american-plan-for-hotel-guests-1862822

Breakfast

  • American Breakfast

                  >Includes eggs, breakfast meats, pancakes,

                    potatoes, and toast. 

                     >In the 1920s, the Beech-Nut Packing Company

                    wanted to increase consumer demand for bacon. 

                    They asked public relations and advertising

                    specialist, Edward Bernays, how to promote a

                    heavier breakfast as the norm to Americans.

                    Mr. Bemays consulted with his personal physician.

                    His physician wrote to 5,000 doctors and asked them

                    whether they thought eating a heavier breakfast

                    would be more beneficial than the normal breakfast

                    of the day (fruit, a grain porridge (oat, wheat or

                    corn meals) or a roll,  and usually a cup of coffee).

                    These doctors encouraged a breakfast of

                    'Bacon and Eggs'. These 'findings' were then published

                     in newspapers and magazines around the country. 

http://www.americantable.org/2012/07/how-bacon-and-eggs-became-the-american-breakfast/

  • Continental Breakfast

​                   > Is a light breakfast in a hotel, restaurant, etc., that usually includes baked

                    goods, jam, fruit, and coffee.

                 >It describes the type of breakfast you’d encounter in places like France

                   and the Mediterranean. 

https://www.thekitchn.com/what-is-a-continental-breakfast-and-what-makes-it-continental-239400

  • English Breakfast

                 > a heaping plate of eggs, bacon, sausage,

                    toast, beans, and roasted mushrooms

                    and tomatoes.