Skip to main content

Black Lives Matter & Anti-Racism: Ebooks

White Fragility

by Robin DiAngelo (Author), Michael Eric Dyson (Foreword)

Publication year: 2018

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

The new Jim Crow : mass incarceration in the age of colorblindness

by Michelle Alexander

Publication year: 2012

This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

Silent racism : how well-meaning white people perpetuate the racial divide

by Barbara Trepagnier

Publication year: 2010

Vivid and engaging, Silent Racism persuasively demonstrates that silent racism―racism by people who classify themselves as “not racist”―is instrumental in the production of institutional racism. Trepagnier argues that heightened race awareness is more important in changing racial inequality than judging whether individuals are racist. The collective voices and confessions of “nonracist” white women heard in this book help reveal that all individuals harbor some racist thoughts and feelings. Trepagnier uses vivid focus group interviews to argue that the oppositional categories of racist/not racist are outdated. The oppositional categories should be replaced in contemporary thought with a continuum model that more accurately portrays today’s racial reality in the United States.

Racism and Resistance : How the Black Panthers Challenged White Supremacy.

by Franziska Meister

Publication year: 2017

Even a cursory look at U.S. society today reveals that protests against racial discrimination are by no means a thing of the past. What can we learn from past movements in order to understand the workings of racism and resistance? In this book, Franziska Meister revisits the Black Panther Party and offers a new perspective on the Party as a whole and its struggle for racial social justice. She shows how the Panthers were engaged in exposing structural racism in the U.S. and depicts them as uniquely resourceful, imaginative and subversive in the ways they challenged White Supremacy while at the same time revolutionizing both the self-conception and the public image of black people. Meister thus highlights an often marginalized aspect of the Panthers: how they sought to reach a world beyond race - by going through race. A message well worth considering in an age of "color blindness"

Seeing white : an introduction to white privilege and race

by Jean O'Malley HalleyAmy EshlemanRamya Mahadevan Vijaya

Publication year: 2010

This interdisciplinary textbook challenges students to see race as everyone's issue. Drawing on sociology, psychology, history, and economics, Seeing White introduces students to the concepts of white privilege and social power. Seeing White is designed to help break down some of the resistance students feel in discussing race. Each chapter opens with compelling concrete examples to help students approach issues from a range of perspectives. The early chapters build a solid understanding of privilege and power, leading to a critical exploration of discrimination. 

White Race Discourse: Preserving Racial Privilege in a Post-Racial Society. 

by John Foster

Publication year: 2013

White Race Discourse exposes and explains the contradictory nature of the race discourse displayed by sixty-one white college students in the United States. While many scholars have written about the "racetalk" of whites, few have succeeded in bridging both the theoretical and methodological gaps between whiteness scholars and discourse analysts. The book presents evidence that these white Americans are "bureaucrats of whiteness" in that they defend the racial status quo through their discourse.

 

Good white people: the problem with middle-class white anti-racism 

by Shannon Sullivan

Publication year: 2014

Building on her book Revealing Whiteness, Shannon Sullivan identifies a constellation of attitudes common among well-meaning white liberals that she sums up as "white middle-class goodness," an orientation she critiques for being more concerned with establishing anti-racist bona fides than with confronting systematic racism and privilege. Sullivan untangles the complex relationships between class and race in contemporary white identity and outlines four ways this orientation is expressed, each serving to establish one's lack of racism: the denigration of lower-class white people as responsible for ongoing white racism, the demonization of antebellum slaveholders, an emphasis on colorblindness--especially in the context of white childrearing--and the cultivation of attitudes of white guilt, shame, and betrayal. To move beyond these distancing strategies, Sullivan argues, white people need a new ethos that acknowledges and transforms their whiteness in the pursuit of racial justice rather than seeking a self-righteous distance from it.

White Logic, White Methods : Racism and Methodology.

by Tukufu ZuberiEduardo Bonilla-Silva

Publication year: 2008

White Logic, White Methods shows the ways that a reigning white ideological methodology has poisoned almost all aspects of social science research. The only way to remedy these prevailing inequalities is for the complete overhaul of current methods, and a movement towards multicultural and pluralist approaches to what we know, think, and question. With an assemblage of leading scholars, this collection explores the possibilities and necessary dethroning of current social research practices.

White Logic, White Methods shows the ways that a reigning white ideological methodology has poisoned almost all aspects of social science research. The only way to remedy these prevailing inequalities is for the complete overhaul of current methods, and a movement towards multicultural and pluralist approaches to what we know, think, and question. With an assemblage of leading scholars, this collection explores the possibilities and necessary dethroning of current social research practices.

White bound : nationalists, antiracists, and the shared meanings of race

by Matthew W Hughey

Publication year: 2012

"Discussions of race are inevitably fraught with tension, both in opinion and positioning. Too frequently, debates are framed as clear points of opposition--us versus them. And when considering white racial identity, a split between progressive movements and a neoconservative backlash is all too frequently assumed. Taken at face value, it would seem that whites are splintering into antagonistic groups, with differing worldviews, values, and ideological stances. White Bound investigates these dividing lines, questioning the very notion of a fracturing whiteness, and in so doing offers a unique view of white racial identity. Matthew Hughey spent over a year attending the meetings, reading the literature, and interviewing members of two white organizations--a white nationalist group and a white antiracist group. Though he found immediate political differences, he observed surprising similarities. Both groups make meaning of whiteness through a reliance on similar racist and reactionary stories and worldviews. On the whole, this book puts abstract beliefs and theoretical projection about the supposed fracturing of whiteness into relief against the realities of two groups never before directly compared with this much breadth and depth. By examining the similarities and differences between seemingly antithetical white groups, we see not just the many ways of being white, but how these actors make meaning of whiteness in ways that collectively reproduce both white identity and, ultimately, white supremacy"

White guys on campus : racism, white immunity, and the myth of "post-racial" higher education 

by Nolan L Cabrera

Publication year: 2018

On April 22, 2015, Boston University professor Saida Grundy set off a Twitter storm with her provocative question: "Why is white America so reluctant to identify white college males as a problem population?" White Guys on Campus is a critical examination of race in higher education, centering Whiteness, in an effort to unveil the frequently unconscious habits of racism among White male undergraduates. Nolan L. Cabrera moves beyond the "few bad apples" frame of contemporary racism, and explores the structures, policies, ideologies, and experiences that allow racism to flourish. This book details many of the contours of contemporary, systemic racism, while engaging the possibility of White students to participate in anti-racism. Ultimately, White Guys on Campus calls upon institutions of higher education to be sites of social transformation instead of reinforcing systemic racism, while creating a platform to engage and challenge the public discourse of "post- racialism."

What's true about race and social change? : a quest, a study, a call to action 

by Max Klau

Publication year: 2017

Recent events have turned the spotlight on the issue of race in modern America, and the current cultural climate calls out for more research, education, dialogue, and understanding. Race and Social Change: A Quest, A Study, A Call to Action focuses on a provocative social science experiment with the potential to address these needs. Through an analysis grounded in the perspectives of developmental psychology, adaptive leadership and complex systems theory, the inquiry at the heart of this book illuminates dynamics of race and social change in surprising and important ways. Author Max Klau explains how his own quest for insight into these matters led to the empirical study at the heart of this book, and he present...

Contesting White Supremacy.

by Timothy J Stanley

Publication year: 2014

In 1922-23, Chinese students in Victoria, British Columbia, went on strike to protest a school board’s attempt to impose segregation. Their resistance was unexpected and runs against the grain of mainstream accounts of Asian exclusion, which tend to ignore the agency of the excluded. In Contesting White Supremacy, Timothy Stanley combines Chinese sources and perspectives with an innovative theory of racism and anti-racism to explain the strike and construct an alternative reading of racism in British Columbia. His work demonstrates that education was an arena in which white supremacy confronted Chinese nationalist schooling and where parents and students contested racism by constructing a new category – Chinese Canadian – to define their identity.

Experiencing racism: exploring discrimination through the eyes of college students

by Richard A SeltzerNicole E Johnson

Publication year: 2009

Experiencing Racism provides a thought-provoking and thorough analysis of how race is lived in America. Collecting essays on personal experiences of race and racism from a wide spectrum of college students, the authors employ existing social science literature and textual analysis to illustrate common themes and departures. The essays and associated analyses capture the impact of racism on its perpetrators and victims, highlighting how individuals choose to cope with racist experiences in their lives. Relevant empirical literature is interwoven throughout the chapters to demonstrate the intersection between existing empirical research and real-life experiences. This book is a depiction of race in America that goes beyond black and white to show how the changing racial contours of America are impacting the ways we view and experience racism.

Power interrupted : antiracist and feminist activism inside the United Nations
by Sylvanna M Falcón

Publication year: 2016
In Power Interrupted, Sylvanna M. Falcón redirects the conversation about UN-based feminist activism toward UN forums on racism. Her analysis of UN antiracism spaces, in particular the 2001 World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance in Durban, South Africa, considers how a race and gender intersectionality approach broadened opportunities for feminist organizing at the global level.

Uprooting racism : how white people can work for racial justice

by Paul Kivel

Publication year: 2017

"There's a long tradition of white people opposing racism--but there are also many excuses we give for not getting involved. Now in a fully updated 4th edition, Uprooting Racism is the supportive, practical go-to guide for helping white people work with others for equal opportunity, democracy, and justice in these divisive and angry times."

Racing to justice : transforming our conceptions of self and other to build an inclusive society

by John A Powell

Publication year: 2012

Renowned social justice advocate John A. Powell persuasively argues that we have not achieved a post-racial society and that there is much work to do to redeem the American promise of inclusive democracy. Culled from a decade of writing about social justice and spirituality, these meditations on race, identity, and social policy provide an outline for laying claim to our shared humanity and a way toward healing ourselves and securing our future. Racing to Justice challenges us to replace attitudes and institutions that promote and perpetuate social suffering with those that foster relationships and a way of being that transcends disconnection and separation.

Civil rights and beyond : African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States

by Brian D Behnken

Publication year: 2016

Civil Rights and Beyond examines the dynamic relationships between African American and Latino/a activists in the United States from the 1930s to the present day. Building on recent scholarship, this book pushes the timeframe for the study of interactions between blacks and a variety of Latino/a groups beyond the standard chronology of the civil rights era. As such, the book merges a host of community histories each with their own distinct historical experiences and activisms to explore group dynamics, differing strategies and activist moments, and the broader quests of these communities for rights and social justice. The collection is framed around the concept of activism, which most fully encompasses the relationships that blacks and Latinos have enjoyed throughout the twentieth century. Wide ranging and pioneering, Civil Rights and Beyond explore black and Latino/a activism from California to Florida, Chicago to Bakersfield and a host of other communities and cities to demonstrate the complicated nature of African American Latino/activism in the twentieth-century United States.

Civil Rights and Liberties.

by Harold J Sullivan

Publication year: 2016

For undergraduate courses in Constitutional Law, Civil Rights & Liberties, Introduction to American Government, Introduction to Law and Legal Process, and Judicial Process & Politics. Examining contemporary and perennial constitutional issues in civil liberties and rights, this text engages students in an exploration of how and why U.S. Supreme Court Justices have interpreted the provisions of the U.S. Constitution relating to freedom of expression and religion, and equal protection and privacy.

We shall overcome : a history of civil rights and the law

by Alexander Tsesis

Publication year: 2008

Despite America's commitment to civil rights from the earliest days of nationhood, examples of injustices against minorities stain many pages of U.S. history. The battle for racial, ethnic, and gender fairness remains unfinished. This comprehensive book t.

Despite America's commitment to civil rights from the earliest days of nationhood, examples of injustices against minorities stain many pages of U.S. history. The battle for racial, ethnic, and gender fairness remains unfinished.

Running for Freedom : Civil Rights and Black Politics in America since 1941.

by Steven F Lawson

Publication year: 2014

Running for Freedom, Fourth Edition, updates historian Steven Lawson's classic volume detailing the history of African-American civil rights and black politics from the beginning of World War II to the present day. Offers comprehensive coverage of the African-American struggle for civil rights in the U.S. from 1941 to 2014 Integrates events relating to America's civil rights story at both the local and national levels Features new material on Obama's first term in office and the first year of his second term Includes addition of such timely issues as the Trayvon Martin case, the March on.

 

The people's lawyer : the Center for Constitutional Rights and the fight for social justice, from civil rights to Guantánamo

by Albert Ruben

Publication year: 2011

"There is hardly a struggle aimed at upholding and extending the rights embedded in the U.S. Constitution in which the Center for Constitutional Rights has not played a central role. Whether defending the rights of black people in the South, opponents of the war in Vietnam, and victims of torture worldwide, or fighting illegal actions of the U.S. government, the CCR has stood ready to take on all comers, regardless of their power and wealth. When the United States declared that the Constitution did not apply to detainees at Guantanamo, the CCR waded fearlessly into battle, its Legal Director declaring that "My job is to defend the Constitution from its enemies. Its main enemies right now are the Justice Department and the White House." In this first-ever comprehensive history of one of the most important legal organizations in the United States, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Ruben shows us exactly what it means to defend the Constitution. He examines the innovative tactics of the CCR, the ways in which a radical organization is built and nurtured, and the impact that the CCR has had on our very conception of the law. This book is a must-read for not only for lawyers, but for all the rest of us who may one day find our rights in jeopardy"

The morning breaks : the trial of Angela Davis

by Bettina Aptheker

Publication year:1999

On August 7, 1970, a revolt by Black prisoners in a Marin County courthouse stunned the nation. In its aftermath, Angela Davis, an African American activist-scholar who had campaigned vigorously for prisoners' rights, was placed on the FBI's "ten most wanted list." Captured in New York City two months later, she was charged with murder, kidnapping, and conspiracy. Her trial, chronicled in this "compelling tale" (Publishers Weekly), brought strong public indictment. The Morning Breaks is a riveting firsthand account of Davis's ordeal and her ultimate triumph, written by an activist in the student, civil rights, and antiwar movements who was intimately involved in the struggle for her release.First published in 1975, and praised by The Nation for its "graphic narrative of [Davis's] legal and public fight," The Morning Breaks remains relevant today as the nation contends with the political fallout of the Sixties and the grim consequences of institutional racism. For this edition, Bettina Aptheker has provided an introduction that revisits crucial events of the late 1960s and early 1970s and puts Davis's case into the context of that time and our own―from the killings at Kent State and Jackson State to the politics of the prison system today. This book gives a first-hand account of the worldwide movement for Angela Davis's freedom and of her trial. It offers a unique historical perspective on the case and its continuing significance in the contemporary political landscape.

Reasoning from race: feminism, law, and the civil rights revolution

by Serena Mayeri

Publication year: 2011

"Informed in 1944 that she was 'not of the sex' entitled to be admitted to Harvard Law School, African American activist Pauli Murray confronted the injustice she called 'Jane Crow.' In the 1960s and 1970s, the analogies between sex and race discrimination pioneered by Murray became potent weapons in the battle for women's rights, as feminists borrowed rhetoric and legal arguments from the civil rights movement. Serena Mayeri's Reasoning from Race is the first book to explore the development and consequences of this key feminist strategy. Mayeri uncovers the history of an often misunderstood connection at the heart of American antidiscrimination law. Her study details how a tumultuous political and legal climate transformed the links between race and sex equality, civil rights and feminism. Battles over employment discrimination, school segregation, reproductive freedom, affirmative action, and constitutional change reveal the promise and peril of reasoning from race--and offer a vivid picture of Pauli Murray, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and others who defined feminists' agenda. Looking beneath the surface of Supreme Court opinions to the deliberations of feminist advocates, their opponents, and the legal decisionmakers who heard--or chose not to hear--their claims, Reasoning from Race showcases previously hidden struggles that continue to shape the scope and meaning of equality under the law"

A. Philip Randolph and the struggle for civil rights

by Cornelius L Bynum

Publication year: 2010

A. Philip Randolph's career as a trade unionist and civil rights activist fundamentally shaped the course of black protest in the mid-twentieth century. Standing alongside individuals such as W.E.B. Du Bois and Marcus Garvey at the center of the cultural renaissance and political radicalism that shaped communities such as Harlem in the 1920s and into the 1930s, Randolph fashioned an understanding of social justice that reflected a deep awareness of how race complicated class concerns, especially among black laborers. Examining Randolph's work in lobbying for the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, threatening to lead a march on Washington in 1941, and establishing the Fair Employment Practice Committee, Cornelius L. Bynum shows that Randolph's push for African American equality took place within a broader progressive program of industrial reform. Some of Randolph's pioneering plans for engineering change--which served as foundational strategies in the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s--included direct mass action, nonviolent civil disobedience, and purposeful coalitions between black and white workers. Bynum interweaves biographical information on Randolph with details on how he gradually shifted his thinking about race and class, full citizenship rights, industrial organization, trade unionism, and civil rights protest throughout his activist career.